On September 30, 2018, T.I. unveiled a new museum to commemorate the impact Trap Music has on today’s culture. Initially, Trap Music emerged from the South, which is home of the hottest original trap rappers like Gucci Mane, Three 6 Mafia, Jeezy, OutKast, UGK, and Master P. The low 808 bass, snappy snares, pipe flutes, and catchy verses provides a unique sound we can hear and feel. It’s no wonder Trap Music has been so influential and embedded into the hip hop world.

Tip “T.I.” Harris dropped his album, Trap Muzik, in 2003 just 15 years ago. His album refers back to his experiences coming up in the streets of Westside Atlanta, where he found his voice. “I wanted to make a classic. I knew I had to make timeless music, which could stand the test of time”, the rapper told Noisey — and that it did.

Trap Music Museum

The museum is partnered with Escape Room ATL, veteran Hip-Hop journalist Maurice Garland, creative artist DL Warfield, and others. Artists who have helped to bring the genre to the forefront of mainstream culture are include: 21 Savage, Gucci Mane, Rick Ross, Future, and Young Jeezy, all of whom will be highlighted in the showcase.

Similar to an escape room, participants will also have a chance to crack codes to “Escape the Trap”. Each set is designed to take you through the experience of the trap culture’s inception as well as the dysfunctional family ties and hardships many face in the streets. Guests can even sign prison walls during this memorable interactive experience.

Trap Music Museum

Its message is to define society’s standards and to rise above stigmas of Hip-Hop culture. In the words of a trusted writer at Pitchfork.com, “Trap Muzik presents the trap as not just a setting or a sound or a state of mind, but as a portal into the self.”

The infamous Bankhead neighborhood will house the Trap Music Museum. Just in time for A3C week, Atlanta’s annual Hip-Hop festival, the Trap Music Museum will be open to the public on October 5th at 630 Travis Street NW, Atlanta, GA.

For more information visit the official Trap Music Museum website.

Written by Chelsea McKain

– On August 19th, 2003, T.I. dropped Trap Muzik – the album that would make him a nationwide star and introduce a subgenre of hip-hop that would become its go-to sound.

Trap music has taken over. There is no doubt about it. So much so, various regions across the United States (and even the world) have begun to adopt this rapper’s sound and reformulate it in many different ways. This has led many to make the case that Atlanta is the new hip-hop hub or, in the words of 2 Chainz, “We took the ball”. To many of hip-hop’s earliest and most passionate followers, that’s a highly sensitive conversation topic. However, trap music has undoubtedly made a huge impact on mainstream music, and T.I. is unquestionably one of its earliest pioneers. Talk about a grand hustle.

Trap Muzik was recorded between December 2002 and July 2003 before being released the next month. T.I. was able to enjoy substantial commercial success selling 110,000 copies in the first week and 1,070,000 copies to date with “24’s”, “Let’s Get Away”, “Be Easy”, and “Rubber Band Man” as the album’s lead singles. This was a major recovery from T.I’s debut album, I’m Serious, which sold poorly and was met with lackluster reception. However, the rapper’s decision to stay true to his southern roots and enlist the help of legendary producers such as Jazze Pha, Kanye West, DJ Toomp, and David Banner proved to be the right move.

T.I. has also opened up about the overall message in this project in comparison to his prior works.

It’s informative for people who don’t know nothing about that side of life and wonder why somebody they know that live on that side of life act the way they do or do the things they do. So it’s informative for them and maybe it can help them deal with these people, help them relate to these people, help them understand, help them to see their point of view a little better.”

He has even gone a bit deeper by stating,

It’s another outlook on the trap. Before, trappin’ was cool, but now trappin’ ain’t cool. It’s necessary for some, but no, it ain’t cool – even if you a hustler. All the hustlers I know – sellin’ dope is the last thing they wanna do. If you a real hustler, you gon’ move on to bigger and better things.”

Spoken like a true hustler indeed…

Written by DJ Robinson

 

The 40 Years of Hip Hop Mashup is what you need to hold you over until you make it back to the aux cord after work. Chicago based production group, The Hood Internet, known for their pretty interesting song mashups posted to YouTube and Soundcloud, have taken on the task of smashing 40 years of hip hop into 4 minutes. It sounds damn near impossible but they did it, with each artist finishing the bars of the last. That’s the real feat here but they made it seem so effortless without missing a beat, resulting in a very solid hip hop mini history lesson.

There’s really something for every hip hop head in this mix. I’ve really never been so satisfied with tiny snippets of music but I was able to reminisce on Pimp C, get a Pac fix, and Harlem Shake to “All About The Benjamins” all in four minutes. The Hood Internet wasn’t playing games about going back in time either; The 40 Years of Hip Hop Mashup has Afrika Bambataa and Grandmaster Flash somehow cohesively sharing a slot with Ying Yang Twins and House of Pain. It was nice to see that The 40 Years of Hip Hop Mashup made sure not to leave out the female hip hop presence with appearances from Lauryn Hill, Missy, and Salt N Pepa.

Head over to The Hood Internet SoundCloud page for more and check out the list of all of the featured artists below.

2 Pac, 50 Cent, A Tribe Called Quest, Afrika Bambaataa, Audio Two, AZ, Beastie Boys, BG, Big Pun, Biz Markie, Black Rob, Black Sheep, Blackstreet, Bobby Shmurda, Boogie Down Productions, Busta Rhymes, Cali Swag District, Cam’ron, Chamillionaire, Chance The Rapper, Clipse, Common, Craig Mack, Cypress Hill, David Banner, De La Soul, Dead Prez, Digable Planets, Digital Underground, DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, DJ Kool, DJ Quik & Kurupt, DMX, Doug E Fresh, Dr. Dre, Drake, Eazy-E, Eminem, Eric B. & Rakim, Funky 4+1, Gang Starr, Geto Boys, Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five, GZA, House of Pain, Ice Cube, J-Kwon, Jadakiss, Jay Electronica, Jay-Z, JJ Fad, Juvenile, Kanye West, Kendrick Lamar, Kid Cudi, KRS-One, Lauryn Hill, Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz, Lil Kim, Lil Troy, Lil Wayne, LL Cool J, Ludacris, Madvillain, MC Shan, Meek Mill, MF DOOM, Missy Elliott, Mobb Deep, Montell Jordan, MOP, Nas, Naughty By Nature, Nelly, Nicki Minaj, Notorious B.I.G, N.W.A, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Outkast, Pete Rock & CL Smooth, Petey Pablo, Pharoahe Monch, Public Enemy, Puff Daddy, Quad City DJs, Rich Boy, Rick Ross, Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock, Run-DMC, Salt N Pepa, Scarface, Schoolly D, Sir Mix-A-Lot, Skee-Lo, Slick Rick, Snoop Dogg, Soulja Boy, Sugarhill Gang, T La Rock, T-Wayne, T.I., Terror Squad, The Fat Boys, The Fatback Band, The Fugees, The Game, The Pack, The Pharcyde, The Roots, Three 6 Mafia, Tone Loc, Tyga, UGK, Usher, UTFO, Warren G, Whodini, Wreckx-N-Effect, Wu-Tang Clan, Ying Yang Twins, Young Gunz

Written by ViV